Sophistical Rhetoric in Classical Greece (Studies in Rhetoric/Communication)

John Poulakos


In Sophistical Rhetoric in Classical Greece, John Poulakos bargains a brand new conceptualization of sophistry, explaining its course and form in addition to the explanations why Plato, Isocrates, and Aristotle came upon it objectionable. Poulakos argues right knowing of sophistical rhetoric calls for a grab of 3 cultural dynamics of the 5th century B.C.: the common sense of situations, the ethic of festival, and the cultured of exhibition. Traced to such phenomena as daily practices, athletic contests, and dramatic performances, those dynamics set the degree for the position of sophistical rhetoric in Hellenic tradition and clarify why sophistry has ordinarily been understood as inconsistent, agonistic, and ostentatious. In his dialogue of historical responses to sophistical rhetoric, Poulakos observes that Plato, Isocrates, and Aristotle came upon sophistry morally reprehensible, politically lifeless, and theoretically incoherent. even as, they produced their very own model of rhetoric that endorsed moral integrity, political unification, and theoretical coherence. Poulakos explains that those responses and replacement models have been prompted by way of a look for strategies to such ancient difficulties as ethical uncertainty, political instability, and social ailment. Poulakos concludes that sophistical rhetoric used to be as worthwhile in its day as its Platonic, Isocratean, and Aristotelian opposite numbers have been in theirs.

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