A State of Mixture: Christians, Zoroastrians, and Iranian Political Culture in Late Antiquity (Transformation of the Classical Heritage)


Christian groups flourished in the course of overdue antiquity in a Zoroastrian political method, referred to as the Iranian Empire, that built-in culturally and geographically disparate territories from Arabia to Afghanistan into its associations and networks. while earlier reports have seemed Christians as marginal, insular, and sometimes persecuted individuals during this empire, Richard Payne demonstrates their integration into elite networks, adoption of Iranian political practices and imaginaries, and participation in imperial institutions.

 The upward thrust of Christianity in Iran relied on the Zoroastrian conception and perform of hierarchical, differentiated inclusion, based on which Christians, Jews, and others occupied valid areas in Iranian political tradition in positions subordinate to the imperial faith. Christians, for his or her half, located themselves in a political tradition now not in their personal making, with recourse to their very own ideological and institutional assets, starting from the writing of saints’ lives to the judicial arbitration of bishops. In putting the social background of East Syrian Christians on the middle of the Iranian imperial tale, A nation of Mixture is helping clarify the persistence of a culturally assorted empire throughout 4 centuries.
 

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